The Association between Bullying Victimization and Subjective Well-Being among Children: Does the Role of Child Religiosity Matter?

Adeem Ahmad Massarwi, Daphna Gross-Manos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Bullying is a major risk factor for poor psychological development for both children and adolescents worldwide. The current study, based on data from the International Survey of Children’s Well-Being (ISCWeB), explores the association between bullying victimization and subjective well-being as well as the moderating role of the child religiosity in this context among a sample of 2733 children aged 10–12 years old in Israel. Data was collected from children using self-reporting questionnaires, adopting a random stratified sampling method. A PROCESS moderation analysis was performed using SPSS for assessing the part played by child religiosity in moderating bullying victimization and the subjective well-being of children. This produced two key findings: first, children’s subjective well-being is negatively associated with bullying victimization; second, children’s religiosity serves as a protective factor by moderating the association between the child’s bullying victimization and subjective well-being. In light of the results, we recommend professionals who work with children to incorporate spiritual and religious resources into school-based interventions aiming at strengthening the child’s inner resilience and help overcome difficulties in their lives, based on a religious coping strategies.

Original languageEnglish
Article number9644
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume19
Issue number15
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Aug 2022

Keywords

  • bullying victimization
  • children
  • religiosity
  • well-being

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Pollution
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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