The Authentic Inner Compass as an Important Motivational Experience and Structure: Antecedents and Benefits

Avi Assor, Moti Benita, Yael Geifman

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

Abstract

This chapter focuses on the sense of having an authentic inner compass (AIC): the perception and feeling of knowing what is really important to one, because one has explicit and articulable self-guiding core preferences that feel voluntary and authentic. These core preferences reflect foundational values and personal inclinations, and long-term goals derived from them. The experience of having an AIC is presented as one of five facets of the meta-need for authentic self-direction (i.e., autonomy), which together promote optimal realization of more specific basic needs and personal inclinations. Research shows that the experience of having a firm AIC promotes true volition to engage in activities and contexts enabling AIC realization, vitality, sense of meaning, resisting negative peer pressures, and other optimal-functioning indicators. Educational and childrearing practices promoting or hindering AIC development are presented. The emphasis on articulable authentic core preferences underlying the sense of AIC reflects a view of autonomy as authentic intentionality and agency.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Oxford Handbook of Self-Determination Theory
EditorsRichard M. Ryan
Place of PublicationNew York
PublisherOxford University Press
Pages362-386
ISBN (Electronic) 9780197600078
ISBN (Print)9780197600047
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2023

Publication series

NameOXFORD LIBRARY OF PSYCHOLOGY SERIES
PublisherOxford University Press

Keywords

  • authentic inner compass
  • authenticity
  • autonomy need satisfaction
  • control
  • Educational Psychology
  • fostering inner valuing
  • freedom
  • inherent value demonstration
  • motivation
  • Social Psychology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The Authentic Inner Compass as an Important Motivational Experience and Structure: Antecedents and Benefits'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this