The complexity of degree anonymization by graph contractions

Sepp Hartung, Nimrod Talmon

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

We study the computational complexity of k-anonymizing a given graph by as few graph contractions as possible. A graph is said to be k-anonymous if for every vertex in it, there are at least k − 1 other vertices with exactly the same degree. The general degree anonymization problem is motivated by applications in privacy-preserving data publishing, and was studied to some extent for various graph operations (most notable operations being edge addition, edge deletion, vertex addition, and vertex deletion). We complement this line of research by studying several variants of graph contractions, which are operations of interest, for example, in the contexts of social networks and clustering algorithms. We show that the problem of degree anonymization by graph contractions is NP-hard even for some very restricted inputs, and identify some fixed-parameter tractable cases.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationTheory and Applications of Models of Computation - 12th Annual Conference, TAMC 2015, Proceedings
EditorsRahul Jain, Sanjay Jain, Frank Stephan
PublisherSpringer Verlag
Pages260-271
Number of pages12
ISBN (Electronic)9783319171418
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2015
Externally publishedYes
Event12th Annual Conference on Theory and Applications of Models of Computation, TAMC 2015 - Singapore, Singapore
Duration: 18 May 201520 May 2015

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume9076
ISSN (Print)0302-9743
ISSN (Electronic)1611-3349

Conference

Conference12th Annual Conference on Theory and Applications of Models of Computation, TAMC 2015
Country/TerritorySingapore
CitySingapore
Period18/05/1520/05/15

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