The dark side of user participation-the effect of calls to action on trust and information revelation

Naama Ilany-Tzur, Lior Zalmanson, Gal Oestreicher-Singer

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

User participation, a practice encouraged by many e-businesses these days is considered a positive experience for all involved. Yet this study shows that such encouragement can cause users to expose themselves to potentially harmful consequences, by enhancing their trust in the website and leading them to be more willing to reveal personal information. We perform a series of empirical experiments, utilizing a YouTube-like video browsing platform and find that users who are exposed to prompts that require them to rate videos subsequently report higher trust in the site and reveal more personal information, compared with users who are not exposed to such prompts. Exposure to prompts does not affect users' general attitudes regarding privacy. We test alternative scenarios to attempt to identify the sources of the phenomena, and we link our results to previous work on website-initiated participation and self-perception theory. We discuss both theoretical and policy implications.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2016 International Conference on Information Systems, ICIS 2016
PublisherAssociation for Information Systems
ISBN (Electronic)9780996683135
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2016
Externally publishedYes
Event2016 International Conference on Information Systems, ICIS 2016 - Dublin, Ireland
Duration: 11 Dec 201614 Dec 2016

Publication series

Name2016 International Conference on Information Systems, ICIS 2016

Conference

Conference2016 International Conference on Information Systems, ICIS 2016
Country/TerritoryIreland
CityDublin
Period11/12/1614/12/16

Keywords

  • Calls to action
  • Information disclosure
  • Privacy
  • User participation

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