The dynamics of goal-setting: Interactive effects of goal difficulty, goal specificity and duration of practice time intervals

Gershon Tenenbaum, Michael Bar-Eli, Michal Yaaron

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

A re-analysis of Bar-Eli et al. (1997) data was carried out to investigate the dynamics of goal attainability as a function of goal difficulty/attainability and goal proximity. More specifically, the re-analysis was designed to clarify whether setting relatively long term goals result in gradual increase in sit-ups gains or the dynamics of this process are different. The results indicate that setting long-term goals result in gradual increases throughout the whole period set for the performers. Easy and difficult/realistic goals were the most beneficial ones compared to very difficult/unattainable, «do», and «do your best» goals and these differences were consistent along the whole designated period. The results are discussed with respect to Locke and Latham's (1990) goal attainability theory, Bandura's (1997) self-efficacy theory, and findings in the sport and motor domain.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)325-338
Number of pages14
JournalInternational Journal of Sport Psychology
Volume30
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1 Dec 1999

Keywords

  • Difficulty
  • Duration
  • Goal-setting
  • Specificity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology

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