The effects of an object’s height and weight on force calibration and kinematics when post-stroke and healthy individuals reach and grasp

Ronit Feingold-Polak, Anna Yelkin, Shmil Edelman, Amir Shapiro, Shelly Levy-Tzedek

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Impairment in force regulation and motor control impedes the independence of individuals with stroke by limiting their ability to perform daily activities. There is, at present, incomplete information about how individuals with stroke regulate the application of force and control their movement when reaching, grasping, and lifting objects of different weights, located at different heights. In this study, we assess force regulation and kinematics when reaching, grasping, and lifting a cup of two different weights (empty and full), located at three different heights, in a total of 46 participants: 30 sub-acute stroke participants, and 16 healthy individuals. We found that the height of the reached target affects both force calibration and kinematics, while its weight affects only the force calibration when post-stroke and healthy individuals perform a reach-to-grasp task. There was no difference between the two groups in the mean and peak force values. The individuals with stroke had slower, jerkier, less efficient, and more variable movements compared to the control group. This difference was more pronounced with increasing stroke severity. With increasing stroke severity, post-stroke individuals demonstrated altered anticipation and preparation for lifting, which was evident for either cortical lesion side.

Original languageEnglish
Article number20559
JournalScientific Reports
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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