The Kelenderis pottery workshop(s): newly identified agents in East Mediterranean maritime exchange networks in the Achaemenid period

Gunnar Lehmann, Yiftah Shalev, Hans Mommsen, David Ben-Shlomo, Małgorzata Daszkiewicz, Gerwulf Schneider, Ayelet Gilboa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

During the Persian (or Achaemenid) period, simply band-painted bowls, plates, jugs, table amphorae and hydriae are documented in the Levant — in particular in the coastal regions — as one of the most common groups of decorated ceramics. Vessels of this style — mostly drinking vessels — were recorded in significant quantities at most coastal sites in southern Turkey, Syria, Israel, Cyprus, and occasionally also in Egypt. The band-painted decoration resembles East Greek styles and initial studies identified these vessels as variations of East Greek ceramics imported to the eastern Mediterranean from Ionian cities. In this study, we examined a large sample of this pottery from the northern and southern Levant, both stylistically and by fabric analysis, applying Neutron Activation Analyses (NAA), Wavelength Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (WD-XRF) and petrography. We demonstrate that almost all the vessels of this particular, and popular, style were produced at one site only — Kelenderis, in Cilicia — which during the Persian period distributed its merchandise extensively to large parts of the eastern Mediterranean. The newly identified Mediterranean NAA group was labelled ‘Kelenderis A’ (KelA). The results require a reconsideration of commercial and other Mediterranean interconnections during this period.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-27
Number of pages27
JournalLevant
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2020

Keywords

  • Levantine Archaeology
  • Mediterranean archaeology
  • Neutron Activation Analysis and XRF pottery analysis
  • Persian/Achaemenid period
  • ancient pottery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Archaeology
  • History
  • Archaeology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The Kelenderis pottery workshop(s): newly identified agents in East Mediterranean maritime exchange networks in the Achaemenid period'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this