The Landscape of Molecular Chaperones Across Human Tissues Reveals a Layered Architecture of Core and Variable Chaperones

Netta Shemesh, Juman Jubran, Shiran Dror, Eyal Simonovsky, Omer Basha, Chanan Argov, Idan Hekselman, Mehtap Abu-Qarn, Ekaterina Vinogradov, Omry Mauer, Tatiana Tiago, Serena Carra, Anat Ben-Zvi, Esti Yeger-Lotem

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

The sensitivity of the protein-folding environment to chaperone disruption can be highly tissue-specific. Yet, the organization of the chaperone system across physiological human tissues has received little attention. Through computational analyses of large-scale tissue transcriptomes, we unveil that the chaperone system is composed of core elements that are uniformly expressed across tissues, and variable elements that are differentially expressed to fit with tissue-specific requirements. We demonstrate via a proteomic analysis that the muscle-specific signature is functional and conserved. Core chaperones are significantly more abundant across tissues and more important for cell survival than variable chaperones. Together with variable chaperones, they form tissue-specific functional networks. Analysis of human organ development and aging brain transcriptomes reveals that these functional networks are established in development and decline with age. In this work, we expand the known functional organization of de novo versus stress-inducible eukaryotic chaperones into a layered core-variable architecture in multi-cellular organisms.

Original languageEnglish GB
Article number2180
JournalNature Communications
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 12 Apr 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry (all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology (all)
  • Physics and Astronomy (all)

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