The laser firefly; a distributed optical wireless sensor system for atmospheric and oceanic probing

Debbie Kedar, Shlomi Arnon

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

In this paper we review the concept of "Laser Firefly Clusters" for atmospheric probing and describe the development of the first and second generation versions. The laser firefly cluster is a mobile and versatile distributed sensing system with the purpose of profiling the chemical and particulate composition of the atmosphere on the basis of its optical properties. The primary applications are pollution monitoring, and detection of contamination as well as scientific research, meteorology and others. In this paper we extend the concept from the atmospheric to the oceanic environment and introduce "Optical Plankton". The special features of the ocean as a channel for optical wireless communication are characterized and the distinctive requirements of monitoring the oceanic particulate composition are addressed.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationINFORMATION OPTICS
Subtitle of host publication5th International Workshop on Information Optics, WIO'06
PublisherAmerican Institute of Physics Inc.
Pages151-158
Number of pages8
ISBN (Print)0735403562, 9780735403567
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2006
EventINFORMATION OPTICS: 5th International Workshop on Information Optics, WIO'06 - Toledo, Spain
Duration: 5 Jun 20067 Jun 2006

Publication series

NameAIP Conference Proceedings
Volume860
ISSN (Print)0094-243X
ISSN (Electronic)1551-7616

Conference

ConferenceINFORMATION OPTICS: 5th International Workshop on Information Optics, WIO'06
Country/TerritorySpain
CityToledo
Period5/06/067/06/06

Keywords

  • Atmospheric probing
  • CDMA
  • Distributed sensing
  • MEMS
  • Oceanic monitoring

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy (all)

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