The many faces of music: Attending to music and delight in the same music are governed by different rules of processing

Merav Ben-Nathan, Moti Salti, Daniel Algom

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    Music generates manifold experiences in humans, some perceptual and some hedonic. Are these qualia governed by the same principles in processing? In particular, do the loudness and timbre of melodies combine to produce perception and likeability by the same rules of integration? In Experiment 1, we tested selective attention to loudness and timbre by applying Garner's speeded classification paradigm and found both to be perceptually integral dimensions. In Experiment 2, we tested liking for the same music by applying Norman Anderson's functional measurement model and found loudness and timbre to combine by an adding-type rule. In Experiment 3, we applied functional measurement for perception and found loudness and timbre to interact as in Experiment 1. These results show that people cannot or do not attend selectively or perceive separately any one music component, but that they nonetheless can isolate the components when they enjoy (or disenjoy) listening to music. We conclude that perception of the constituent components of a musical piece and the processing of the same components for liking are governed by different rules.

    Original languageEnglish
    Article number102949
    JournalActa Psychologica
    Volume200
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 1 Sep 2019

    Keywords

    • Functional measurement
    • Garner interference
    • Music hedonics
    • Music perception

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