The million tweets fallacy: Activity and feedback are uncorrelated

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this paper we point to a surprising phenomenon in Online Social Networks (OSNs), which we call “The Million Tweets Fallacy”. Our hypothesis is that the measurements of activity of a user in an OSN are not correlated with the measurements of feedback that the user receives on that activity. For example, the number of tweets is uncorrelated with the number of retweets or likes. In other words, a voluminously tweeting user is not necessarily fuelled by the attention he gets from his followers. An innovative aspect of this work is that we treat “activity” and “feedback” as multidimensional axes, and do not reduce the problem to a one-dimensional pairwise correlation problem. We apply our methodology to six OSNs. For Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn and Steam we gathered the data ourselves, collecting features that cover both users' activity and feedback in the OSN. For YouTube and Flickr we used existing data from the literature. In all OSNs, with the only exception of Steam, we confirmed our hypothesis.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication12th International AAAI Conference on Web and Social Media, ICWSM 2018
PublisherAAAI press
Pages688-691
Number of pages4
ISBN (Electronic)9781577357988
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2018
Event12th International AAAI Conference on Web and Social Media, ICWSM 2018 - Palo Alto, United States
Duration: 25 Jun 201828 Jun 2018

Publication series

Name12th International AAAI Conference on Web and Social Media, ICWSM 2018

Conference

Conference12th International AAAI Conference on Web and Social Media, ICWSM 2018
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityPalo Alto
Period25/06/1828/06/18

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Networks and Communications

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The million tweets fallacy: Activity and feedback are uncorrelated'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this