The outwardly rectifying current of layer 5 neocortical neurons that was originally identified as "non-specific cationic" is essentially a potassium current

Omer Revah, Lior Libman, Ilya A. Fleidervish, Michael J. Gutnick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

In whole-cell patch clamp recordings from layer 5 neocortical neurons, blockade of voltage gated sodium and calcium channels leaves a cesium current that is outward rectifying. This current was originally identified as a "non-specific cationic current", and subsequently it was hypothesized that it is mediated by TRP channels. In order to test this hypothesis, we used fluorescence imaging of intracellular sodium and calcium indicators, and found no evidence to suggest that it is associated with influx of either of these ions to the cell body or dendrites. Moreover, the current is still prominent in neurons from TRPC1-/- and TRPC5-/- mice. The effects on the current of various blocking agents, and especially its sensitivity to intracellular tetraethylammonium, suggest that it is not a non-specific cationic current, but rather that it is generated by cesium-permeable delayed rectifier potassium channels.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0132108
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume10
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 21 Jul 2015

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