The practical, moral, and ethical considerations of the new Israeli law for the allocation of donor organs

B. F. Gruenbaum, A. Jotkowitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

There is a worldwide shortage of organs for transplantation; the number of patients on the waiting list exceeds the supply of available organs. The demand for organ donation is particularly concerning in Israel. A new Israeli law has been instituted to give those who sign donor cards allocation priority if they are ever in need of an organ transplant themselves. A number of variations on this paradigm that considers the willingness of patients to donate their own organs have since been proposed; however, the new Israeli policy for organ donation is the first time such a law has been implemented nationally. Prioritization of organ allocation to donors comes with a significant moral and ethical debate, and since its implementation in January 2010 there has been much controversy surrounding the new policy. This article provides a description of the new Israeli plan, specifically focusing on the practical, moral, and ethical debates surrounding the new system.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4475-4478
Number of pages4
JournalTransplantation Proceedings
Volume42
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Transplantation

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