The prevalence of pain complaints in a general population in Israel and its implications for utilization of health services

Dan Buskila, Galina Abramov, Amnon Biton, Lily Neumann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

96 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective. To determine the prevalence of pain complaints, specifically of chronic widespread pain, in the general population; and to explore the utilization of health services by various pain groups. Methods. Cross sectional population survey of 2210 adults in the southern part of Israel, who were classified into 5 pain groups: no pain, transient pain, chronic regional pain, chronic widespread pain, and other. Participants were interviewed about pain patterns and utilization of health services. Results. Forty-four percent reported pain on the day of the interview. The prevalence of chronic widespread pain in the study population was 9.9%, 14% in women and 3% in men (p < 0.01). The prevalence in the Israeli adult population was estimated after adjusting for sex and age as 10.2%. The prevalence of any chronic pain (regional or widespread) increased with age. The prevalence of chronic widespread pain was significantly higher in women than in men across all age groups (p < 0.01). Persons with chronic widespread pain reported most frequent visits to their physicians (10.8 visits/year) and most frequent use of antiinflammatory and analgesic drugs. They were more frequently referred to specialists and tended to be hospitalized slightly more often. Conclusion. In the general population in Israel, widespread pain is common, and its prevalence is comparable with reports from USA, UK, and Canada.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1521-1525
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Rheumatology
Volume27
Issue number6
StatePublished - 26 Jun 2000
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Localized pain health services utilization
  • Pain prevalence
  • Widespread pain

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