The relation between nuclear reactor core size and xenon-induced spatial oscillations

Nir Kastin, Assaf Kolin, Ehud Meron, Shai Kinast

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

The relations between xenon-induced spatial oscillations and the size of a reactor core are analyzed. The study is based on linear stability analysis of steady-state solutions to small perturbations in time and space. We show that there exists a minimal core size in which spatial perturbations may rise. Moreover, this minimal size depends strongly on the reactor power, as well as on the neutron diffusion length, but is not sensitive to changes in the power feedback coefficient. The dependence of the minimal size on the reactor power is found to be separated into high and low flux ranges. The results may be used to analyze the susceptibility of large next-generation nuclear reactors to xenon instability.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationInternational Conference on Physics of Reactors, PHYSOR 2018
Subtitle of host publicationReactor Physics Paving the Way Towards More Efficient Systems
PublisherSociedad Nuclear Mexicana, A.C.
Pages2784-2793
Number of pages10
ISBN (Electronic)9781713808510
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2018
Event2018 International Conference on Physics of Reactors: Reactor Physics Paving the Way Towards More Efficient Systems, PHYSOR 2018 - Cancun, Mexico
Duration: 22 Apr 201826 Apr 2018

Publication series

NameInternational Conference on Physics of Reactors, PHYSOR 2018: Reactor Physics Paving the Way Towards More Efficient Systems
VolumePart F168384-5

Conference

Conference2018 International Conference on Physics of Reactors: Reactor Physics Paving the Way Towards More Efficient Systems, PHYSOR 2018
Country/TerritoryMexico
CityCancun
Period22/04/1826/04/18

Keywords

  • Linear stability analysis
  • Reactor operation
  • Spatial oscillations
  • Xenon oscillations

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