The relationship of childhood emotional abuse and neglect to depressive vulnerability and low self–efficacy

Nirit Soffer, Eva Gilboa-schechtman, Golan Shahar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

42 Scopus citations

Abstract

We examined associations between self–reported childhood maltreatment and depressive risk (sociotropy, autonomy, and self–criticism), and resilience (self–efficacy). Students (N = 203) reported childhood emotional abuse (CEA), emotional neglect (CEN), psychological distress, cognitive vulnerability, and resilience. CEA and CEN constitute separate predictors for cognitive risk and resilience, respectively: CEA was related to heightened depressive vulnerability and CEN was related to lower levels of resilience. The presence of negative parent–child interactions might contribute to the development of rigid and dysfunctional negative self–schemas, whereas the lack of positive parent–child interactions might prevent the construction of positive beliefs about the self and thus the formation of psychological resilience (or positive self–schemas).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)151-162
Number of pages12
JournalInternational Journal of Cognitive Therapy
Volume1
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2008

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The relationship of childhood emotional abuse and neglect to depressive vulnerability and low self–efficacy'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this