The role of explorative tympanotomy in patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss with and without perilymphatic fistula

N. K. Prenzler, B. Schwab, D. M. Kaplan, S. El-Saied

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose The purpose of this study was to describe the role of explorative tympanotomy in patients with Profound Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss (SSNHL) without clinical evidence of perilymphatic or labyrinthine fistula and to compare intraoperative findings with the postoperative hearing outcome. Study design Retrospective study of all patients diagnosed with SSNHL who underwent explorative tympanotomy between 2002 and 2005. Settings Tertiary care university-affiliated hospital. Subjects and methods Eighty-two patients were diagnosed with unilateral profound SSNHL and underwent tympanotomy with sealing of the round and oval windows. Values of pure tone audiograms and percentage hearing loss of patients with and without intraoperative diagnosed perilymphatic fistula (PLF) were compared and analyzed. Results PLF was diagnosed in 28% cases intraoperatively. In most cases, hearing improved significantly after surgery. Interestingly, patients with PLF had a 2.4 times greater decrease of percentage hearing loss compared to patients without PLF. Conclusions Explorative tympanotomy seems to be useful in patients with profound SSNHL. Patients with PLF benefit more from the surgical procedure and have better outcome than patients without PLF.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)46-49
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Medicine and Surgery
Volume39
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Oval window
  • Perilymphatic fistula
  • Round window
  • Sudden sensorineural hearing loss
  • Tympanotomy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

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