The short-term effects of a hostility-reduction intervention on male coronary heart disease patients

Yori Gidron, Karina Davidson, Iqbal Bata

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

100 Scopus citations

Abstract

This preliminary study examined the effects of a hostility-reduction intervention on patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). Twenty-two high- hostile CHD men were matched on age and hostility and then randomly assigned to a hostility intervention (N= 10) or an information-control group (N= 12). Patients were reassessed immediately and 2 months posttreatment on hostility (with self-report and structured interview) and resting blood pressure. The intervention's overall effect size was moderately strong (d' = .62). Intervention patients reported at both reassessments and were observed at follow-up to be less hostile than controls. At follow-up, intervention patients had significantly lower diastolic blood pressure (DBP) than controls. Finally, reductions in hostility were significantly and positively correlated with reductions in DBP. Replication with a larger sample and CHD outcomes is recommended.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)416-420
Number of pages5
JournalHealth Psychology
Volume18
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jul 1999

Keywords

  • Blood pressure
  • Coronary heart disease
  • Hostility
  • Intervention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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