The significance of maternal asymptomatic bacteriuria during pregnancy on long-term infectious morbidity of the offspring

Bluma Nae, Tamar Wainstock, Eyal Sheiner

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting Abstract

Abstract

Objective
Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) is a relatively common infectious complication during pregnancy; yet its long-term implications are not well investigated. The present study was aimed to test the association between maternal ASB during pregnancy and long-term infectious morbidity of the offspring (up to 18 years of age).

Study Design
A population-based cohort analysis was conducted, comparing the incidence of long-term infectious morbidity of offspring born to mothers who, based on clinical outpatient medical record, were diagnosed with ASB during pregnancy, to those who did not have ASB. The study was conducted at a single regional tertiary medical center and included all singleton deliveries between the years 1991-2014. Infectious morbidities were based on a predefined set of ICD-9 codes. A Kaplan-Meier survival curve was used to compare cumulative infectious hospitalization incidence between the groups and a Cox regression model was used to adjust for confounding variables.

Results
During the study period, 212,984 deliveries met the inclusion criteria. Of them, 5,378 (2.5%) were diagnosed with ASB during pregnancy. As compared to offspring of non-ASB mothers, total long-term infectious morbidity was significantly higher among newborn to mothers who were diagnosed with ASB (OR=1.2, 95% CI 1.11-1.30, p=< 0.001; Table). Likewise, a Kaplan-Meier curve demonstrated higher cumulative incidence of infectious morbidity among children born to mothers who were diagnosed with ASB (Log rank test p=0.006; Figure). In the Cox regression model, while controlling for maternal age, diabetes mellitus, hypertensive disorders and gestational age, maternal ASB was noted as an independent risk factor for long-term infectious morbidity in the offspring (adjusted HR=1.1, 95% CI 1.01-1.17, p=0.042).

Conclusion
Asymptomatic bacteriuria during pregnancy may increase offspring susceptibility to long-term infectious morbidity.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)S530-S531
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume222
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2020

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