The unwritten history of ethnic co-existence in colonial Africa: An example from Douala, Cameroon

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

Abstract

Using colonial Douala as an example, this essay first reviews the historiographical preoccupation with nationalist protests and uprisings in Cameroon, and then moves to demonstrate the types of cooperatives and solidarities left out of the nationalist drama. Historians of Douala have documented the Duala elite anti-colonial struggle in the interwar years and the nationalist uprising led by the Union des Populations du Cameroun (UPC) of the post-World War II era, but many alternative alliances and communities playing an active role in urban life in this era have eluded their attention. This essay argues that in contrast to nationalist political agitation, the immigrant community residing in the quarter of New Bell beginning in the interwar period represented an alternative consciousness around which immigrants organized their communal life, but the history of this community beyond its role in the violent anti-colonial struggle has been largely overlooked.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationViolence and Non-Violence in Africa
PublisherRoutledge, Taylor & Francis Group
Chapter17
Pages27-43
Number of pages17
ISBN (Print)0203964136, 9780203964132
DOIs
StatePublished - 8 Feb 2007
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (all)

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