The Willingness of Social Work Students to Engage in Policy Practice: The Role of Personality Traits and Political Participation Predictors

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9 Scopus citations

Abstract

The current study aimed to expand our knowledge regarding social work students' willingness to engage in policy practice (EPP). A theoretical model integrating the Big Five personality framework with the 'Civic Voluntarism Model' (CVM) was examined, using a sample of 160 social work students in Israel. Findings revealed a moderate level of EPP willingness. Among the CVM predictors, political skills, political knowledge and political interest were significantly positively associated with social work students' EPP willingness. Among the Big Five traits, extroversion, conscientiousness and openness to experience were significantly associated with EPP willingness. Path analysis showed that political skills were the strongest predictor of EPP willingness and that political skills and extroversion had a direct effect on EPP willingness. The significant mediation paths demonstrated the dynamics by which the study predictors interacted in explaining 49 per cent of the variance in EPP willingness. The study concluded that the examination of a model incorporating the Big Five personality traits and modified CVM predictors provided a comprehensive understanding of EPP willingness and, therefore, should be adopted to explain social workers' actual engagement in policy practice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2381-2398
Number of pages18
JournalBritish Journal of Social Work
Volume51
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2021

Keywords

  • Big Five personality traits
  • Civic Voluntarism Model
  • path analysis
  • policy practice willingness
  • social work students

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

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