Thermal performance of alternative binders lime hemp concrete (LHC) building: comparison with conventional building materials

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1 Scopus citations

Abstract

This research aims to estimate the operational energy (OE) savings of a full-scale building, made of lime hemp concrete (LHC) with alternative binders partly replacing lime, compared to buildings made of conventional materials, e.g. Autoclaved Aerated Concrete (AAC), Hollow Concrete Blocks (HCB), and Expanded Polystyrene (ESP). The thermal performance of small size (1 m × 1 m) different materials test cells was experimentally studied. Experimental results were compared to simulated values obtained by EnergyPlus. Monitored and simulated indoor temperatures were found to be in good agreement. Subsequently, the thermal performance and energy consumption of full-scale buildings (10 m × 10 m × 2.9 m) were simulated by EnergyPlus with a great degree of confidence. In up-scaled building simulations, LHC presented the best thermal performance and consequently the lowest energy consumption, reaching ∼7 kWh/m2/year, nearly Zero Energy Building standards, 90% lower as compared to HCB which obtained the highest energy consumption. Dynamic external window shading was shown to have a significant impact on cooling energy savings. This research clearly shows the high potential of using LHC with alternative binders as a partial replacement for lime, as it has advantages in terms of energy savings, and their equivalent CO2 emissions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)763-776
Number of pages14
JournalBuilding Research and Information
Volume49
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2021

Keywords

  • Clay
  • EnergyPlus
  • hemp
  • lime
  • sustainability
  • thermal simulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Building and Construction

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