Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV)-resistant tomatoes share molecular mechanisms sustaining resistance with their wild progenitor Solanum habrochaites but not with TYLCV-susceptible tomatoes

Dagan Sade, Nir Sade, Yariv Brotman, Henryk Czosnek

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

The wild tomato species Solanum habrochaites (Sh) has been used as a source for tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) resistance in a breeding program to generate a TYLCV-resistant tomato line. Susceptible (S) and resistant (R) lines have been developed through this program. We compared the behavior of R, S and Sh tomato plants upon infection to find out whether the resistant phenotype of R plants originated from Sh. Results showed that mechanisms involving sugar-signaling (i.e., LIN6/HT1), water channels (i.e., TIP1;1), hormone homeostasis (i.e., ABA and SA) and urea accumulation were shared by S. habrochaites and R plants, but not by S. habrochaites and S tomatoes. This finding supports the hypothesis that these mechanisms were introgressed in the R genotype from the wild tomato progenitor during breeding for TYLCV resistance. Hence, identification of genes contributing to resistance to biotic stress from wild tomato species and their introgression into domestic plants ensures tomato supply and food security.

Original languageEnglish
Article number110439
JournalPlant Science
Volume295
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jun 2020

Keywords

  • Biotic stress resistance
  • Hormone homeostasis
  • Solanum habrochaites
  • Solanum lycopersicum
  • Sugar signaling
  • Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV)
  • Tonoplast intrinsic aquaporins
  • Urea accumulation

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