Transcutaneous intraluminal impedance measurement for minimally invasive monitoring of gastric motility: Validation in acute canine models

Michael D. Poscente, Gang Wang, Dobromir Filip, Polya Ninova, Gregory Muench, Orly Yadid-Pecht, Martin P. Mintchev, Christopher N. Andrews

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Transcutaneous intraluminal impedance measurement (TIIM) is a new method to cutaneously measure gastric contractions by assessing the attenuation dynamics of a small oscillating voltage emitted by a battery-powered ingestible capsule retained in the stomach. In the present study, we investigated whether TIIM can reliably assess gastric motility in acute canine models. Methods. Eight mongrel dogs were randomly divided into 2 groups: half received an active TIIM pill and half received an identically sized sham capsule. After 24-hour fasting and transoral administration of the pill (active or sham), two force transducers (FT) were sutured onto the antral serosa at laparotomy. After closure, three standard cutaneous electrodes were placed on the abdomen, registering the transluminally emitted voltage. Thirty-minute baseline recordings were followed by pharmacological induction of gastric contractions using neostigmine IV and another 30-minute recording. Normalized one-minute baseline and post-neostigmine gastric motility indices (GMIs) were calculated and Pearson correlation coefficients (PCCs) between cutaneous and FT GMIs were obtained. Statistically significant GMI PCCs were seen in both baseline and post-neostigmine states. There were no significant GMI PCCs in the sham capsule test. Further chronic animal studies of this novel long-term gastric motility measurement technique are needed before testing it on humans.

Original languageEnglish
Article number691532
JournalGastroenterology Research and Practice
Volume2014
DOIs
StatePublished - 9 Dec 2014
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hepatology
  • Gastroenterology

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