Translocation of heavy metals in medicinally important herbal plants growing on complex organometallic sludge of sugarcane molasses-based distillery waste

Sonam Tripathi, Pooja Sharma, Kshitij Singh, Diane Purchase, Ram Chandra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

43 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study aimed to assess the heavy metals accumulation patterns by some native plants such as Achyranthus aspera L., Amaranthus viridis, Basella alba L., Sesbania bispinosa, Pedalium murex L., and Momordica doica, which have been traditionally employed for medicinal and food purposes. The plants were grown on complex distillery waste containing a mixture of organometallic compounds. Results revealed bioaccumulation of Mn, Cd, Fe, Cr, Cu, As, Se, Mo, and Co in their roots, shoots, and leaves in levels higher than the surrounding sludge. A. aspera was noted as root accumulator for Mn (16.95 mg kg−1), Zn (30.12 mg kg−1), Fe (240.40 mg kg−1), Co (3.19 mg kg−1), while Se (4.07 mg kg−1), Mo (4.36 mg kg−1), was accumulated selectively in the shoot of the plant. Similarly, S. bispinosa, P. murex, and M. doica were found as root accumulators for Mn, Fe, and Ni. A. viridis accumulated Cd, Zn, and Cu in the shoot and leaves of the plant. The high bioconcentration factors (BCF) and translocation factors (TF) observed in these native plants (>1) suggested their tendency to hyperaccumulate heavy metals. The findings highlighted that these plants as a potential metal accumulator may pose health hazards and deteriorate the medicinal property if grown on such wastes.

Original languageEnglish
Article number101434
JournalEnvironmental Technology and Innovation
Volume22
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 May 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Androgenic waste
  • Detoxification
  • Heavy metals
  • Medicinal plants
  • Phytoremediation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Environmental Science
  • Soil Science
  • Plant Science

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