Treadmill training with Virtual Reality to decrease risk of falls in idiopathic fallers: A pilot Study

A. Mirelman, N. Raphaely Beer, M. Dorffman, M. Brozgul, Jm Hausdorff

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Falls in the elderly are a major health problem affecting a third of the elderly over the age of 65. Numerous fall prevention interventions have been suggested but to date, the content of the optimal exercise program as well as its optimal duration and intensity have not yet been established. The Aim of this pilot study was to investigate whether Virtual Reality can be applied to address the multifaceted deficits associated with fall risk in the elderly. Five elderly women (67.1 6.5 years) with a history of falls received 18 sessions (3 per week x 6 weeks) of progressive intensive treadmill training with virtual obstacles (TT + VR) consisting of obstacle navigation. Post-training, gait speed significantly improved during usual walking, dual tasking and while negotiating over-ground obstacles. Dual task cost and over-ground obstacle clearance also improved. TT + VR may be feasible for gait training of elderly fallers and may improve physical performance, gait during complex challenging conditions. Effects of training on fall frequency are still to be determined.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2011 International Conference on Virtual Rehabilitation, ICVR 2011
DOIs
StatePublished - 31 Aug 2011
Externally publishedYes
Event2011 International Conference on Virtual Rehabilitation, ICVR 2011 - Zurich, Switzerland
Duration: 27 Jun 201129 Jun 2011

Publication series

Name2011 International Conference on Virtual Rehabilitation, ICVR 2011

Conference

Conference2011 International Conference on Virtual Rehabilitation, ICVR 2011
Country/TerritorySwitzerland
CityZurich
Period27/06/1129/06/11

Keywords

  • Fall Prevention
  • Gait
  • Idiopathic Fallers
  • Virtual-Reality

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