Treatment of chemical warfare agent casualties: Retention of knowledge and self-perceived competency among military physicians and paramedics

Arthur Shiyovich, Liran Statlender, Muhammad Abu-Tailakh, Ygal Plakht, Shai Shrot, Michael Kassirer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: Specialized training of medical teams for chemical warfare agent (CWA) events is important to save lives. We aimed to evaluate the retention of knowledge (ROK) and self-perceived competency (SPC) of military medical personnel in delivering treatment during CWA events. Methods: A questionnaire and a multiple-choice examination were sent to military physicians and paramedics, evaluating their CWA, ROK, and SPC (study group [SG]). Their assessment was compared to medical personnel immediately post training (reference group [RG]). SG was subdivided into two groups: G1 ≤ 1 year and G2 > 1 year, past training. Results: Overall, 135 participants responded (35-RG, 65% physicians). Self-reported ROK and SPC were significantly higher in RG compared to SG and in G1 compared to G2. Test scores were higher in RG compared to SG, but similar in G1 and G2 groups. SPC was lower compared to ROK in the entire cohort and subgroups. A moderate correlation was found between the self-and testassessed scores (Pearson correlation coefficient 0.45, p < 0.001). Physicians received significantly (p = 0.01) higher test scores in RG compared with paramedics. Conclusions: ROK and SPC among military medical personnel for treatment of CWA casualties deteriorate significantly as early as 1 year post training, SPC > ROK. Thus, we recommend CWA refresher training at least every year.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)702-707
Number of pages6
JournalMilitary Medicine
Volume180
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jun 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Treatment of chemical warfare agent casualties: Retention of knowledge and self-perceived competency among military physicians and paramedics'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this