Turbulence strength estimation and super-resolution from an arbitrary set of atmospherically degraded images

Steve Zamek, Yitzhak Yitzhaky

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

In remote sensing, atmospheric turbulence and aerosols limit the image quality. For many practical cases turbulence is shown to be dominant, especially for horizontal close-to-earth imaging in hot environments. In a horizontal long-range imaging it is usually impractical to measure path-averaged refractive index structure constant Cn2 (which characterizes the turbulence strength) with conventional equipment. In this paper we propose a method for estimation of Cn2 based just on the available recorded turbulence-degraded image sequence. The method exploits the turbulence-induced image "dancing". Cn2 is extracted from the estimated image shifts variance. Experimental comparison with Cn2 measurements using a scintillometer shows reliable estimation results. We also estimate image motion with sub-pixel accuracy for the purpose of obtaining a high-resolution image by applying a simple super-resolution procedure. Results of super-resolution for real imagery are presented.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAtmospheric Optical Modeling, Measurement, and Simulation II
DOIs
StatePublished - 8 Nov 2006
EventAtmospheric Optical Modeling, Measurement, and Simulation II - San Diego, CA, United States
Duration: 15 Aug 200616 Aug 2006

Publication series

NameProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume6303
ISSN (Print)0277-786X

Conference

ConferenceAtmospheric Optical Modeling, Measurement, and Simulation II
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CitySan Diego, CA
Period15/08/0616/08/06

Keywords

  • Atmospheric optics
  • Atmospheric turbulence
  • Refractive index structure constant
  • Super-resolution
  • Turbulence motion estimation

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