Unemployment among younger and older individuals: does conventional data about unemployment tell us the whole story?

Hila Axelrad, Miki Malul, Israel Luski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this research we show that workers aged 30–44 were significantly more likely than those aged 45–59 to find a job a year after being unemployed. The main contribution is demonstrating empirically that since older workers’ difficulties are related to their age, while for younger individuals the difficulties are more related to the business cycle, policy makers must devise different programs to address unemployment among young and older individuals. The solution to youth unemployment is the creation of more jobs, and combining differential minimum wage levels and earned income tax credits might improve the rate of employment for older individuals.

Original languageEnglish
Article number3
JournalJournal for Labour Market Research
Volume52
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2018

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Employment
  • OECD
  • Older workers
  • Unemployment

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Unemployment among younger and older individuals: does conventional data about unemployment tell us the whole story?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this