Variations in nursing baccalaureate education and 30-day inpatient surgical mortality

Joshua Porat-Dahlerbruch, Linda H. Aiken, Karen B. Lasater, Douglas M. Sloane, Matthew D. McHugh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: In 2010, the IOM recommended an increase in the proportion of bachelor's-prepared (BSN) nurses to 80% by 2020. This goal was largely based on evidence linking hospitals with higher proportions of BSN nurses to better patient outcomes. Though, evidence is lacking on whether outcomes differ by a hospital's composition of initial BSN and transitional RN-to-BSN nurses. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine whether risk-adjusted odds of surgical mortality are associated with a hospital's proportion of initial BSN and transitional RN-to-BSN nurses. Methods: Logistic regression models were used to analyze cross-sectional data of general surgical patients, nurses, and hospitals in four large states in 2015 to 2016. Findings: Higher hospital proportions of BSN nurses, regardless of educational pathway, are associated with lower odds of 30-day inpatient surgical mortality. Discussion: Findings support promoting multiple BSN educational pathways to reach the IOM's recommendation of at least an 80% BSN workforce.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)300-308
Number of pages9
JournalNursing Outlook
Volume70
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Mar 2022

Keywords

  • Education
  • Health service research
  • Healthcare workforce
  • Nursing
  • Outcomes research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing (all)

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