Variations in theophylline concentrations detected by 24-hour saliva concentration profiles in ambulatory children with asthma

A. Tal, M. Aviram, R. Gorodischer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Sustained-release theophylline (SRT) therapy was monitored in ambulatory children with asthma by measuring theophylline in citric acid-stimulated saliva. Ninety-six around-the-clock saliva theophylline profiles were performed in 59 children (median age, 8.3 years) under routine life conditions. Five to seven stimulated saliva samples were collected by parents at home during a 24-hour period. Highest (C(max)) and lowest (C(min)) saliva theophylline concentrations (Sal-TC) were not consistently found after or before medication, respectively. C(max) occurred during morning hours (before or after medication) in 82% of patients. C(max) was found immediately before morning or evening dose in as many as 25% of patients. C(min) occurred in 70% of children during evening hours. C(min) was found 4 hours after morning or evening dose in 19% of patients. Excessive fluctuation in Sal-TC between pre- and post-SRT doses during both day and night hours occurred in six patients (286% ± 87% (mean ± SD). Marked circadian variation in Sal-TC was disclosed in 23% of children. The first profile performed was therapeutically satisfactory in only 39% of patients; satisfactory profiles were achieved in other children after changing daily SRT dose or dosing interval. Determination of theophylline concentration in stimulated saliva specimens obtained frequently during a 24-hour period and under routine life conditions is practical and extremely valuable for close monitoring and individualization of theophylline therapy in ambulatory children with asthma.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)238-243
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Volume86
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1 Jan 1990

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

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