Virtual reality training to enhance behavior and cognitive function among children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: brief report

Shirley Shema-Shiratzky, Marina Brozgol, Pablo Cornejo-Thumm, Karen Geva-Dayan, Michael Rotstein, Yael Leitner, Jeffrey M. Hausdorff, Anat Mirelman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

35 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: To examine the feasibility and efficacy of a combined motor-cognitive training using virtual reality to enhance behavior, cognitive function and dual-tasking in children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Methods: Fourteen non-medicated school-aged children with ADHD, received 18 training sessions during 6 weeks. Training included walking on a treadmill while negotiating virtual obstacles. Behavioral symptoms, cognition and gait were tested before and after the training and at 6-weeks follow-up. Results: Based on parental report, there was a significant improvement in children’s social problems and psychosomatic behavior after the training. Executive function and memory were improved post-training while attention was unchanged. Gait regularity significantly increased during dual-task walking. Long-term training effects were maintained in memory and executive function. Conclusion: Treadmill-training augmented with virtual-reality is feasible and may be an effective treatment to enhance behavior, cognitive function and dual-tasking in children with ADHD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)431-436
Number of pages6
JournalDevelopmental Neurorehabilitation
Volume22
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 18 Aug 2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder
  • child
  • executive function
  • exercise
  • virtual reality therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Rehabilitation
  • Developmental Neuroscience

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