Vomiting and Hyponatremia Are Risk Factors for Worse Clinical Outcomes among Patients Hospitalized Due to Nonsurgical Abdominal Pain

Idan Goren, Ariel Israel, Narin N. Carmel-Neiderman, Iris Kliers, Irina Gringauz, Amir Dagan, Bruno Lavi, Omer Segal, Gad Segal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

After initial evaluation in the Emergency Department (ED), many patients complaining of abdominal pain are classified as suffering from nonsurgical abdominal pain (NSAP). Clinical characteristics and risk factors for worse prognosis were not published elsewhere. Characterizing the clinical profile of patients hospitalized due to NSAP and identifying predictor variables for worse clinical outcomes. We made a retrospective cohort analysis of patients hospitalized due to NSAP compared to matched control patients (for age, gender, and Charlson comorbidity index) hospitalized due to other, nonsurgical reasons in a ratio of 1 to 10. We further performed in-group analysis of patients admitted due to NSAP in order to appreciate variables (clinical and laboratory parameters) potentially associated with worse clinical outcomes. Overall 23,584 patients were included, of which 2144 were admitted due to NSAP and 21,440 were matched controls. Patients admitted due to NSAP had overall better clinical outcomes: they had lower rates of in-hospital and 30-days mortality (2.8% vs 5.5% and 7.9% vs 10.4% respectively, P<0.001 for both comparisons). They also had a significantly shorter length of hospital stay (3.9 vs 6.2 days, P<0.001). Rates of re-hospitalization within 30-days were not significantly different between study groups. Among patients hospitalized due to NSAP, we found that vomiting or hyponatremia at presentation or during hospital stay were associated with worse clinical outcomes. Compared to patients hospitalized due to other, nonsurgical reasons, the overall prognosis of patients admitted due to NSAP is favorable. The combination of NSAP with vomiting and hyponatremia is associated with worse clinical outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere3274
JournalMedicine (United States)
Volume95
Issue number14
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Apr 2016
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (all)

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