Vospitanie - eto rabotaintercultural encounters in educational communication within Russian-speaking families in Israel

Claudia Zbenovich, Julia Lerner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

The article takes a look at cross-cultural interpersonal communication between children, their parents and grandparents in the families of Russian-Israelis and examines how the Russian-Soviet educational discourse persists in the post-Soviet immigrant family, keeps its meanings or changes itself through migration. Examining the micro-cultural level of everyday conversations between parents and grandparents and their offspring, we suggest that the original Russian-Soviet educational messages, regarding the importance of self-discipline and the acceptance of authority, are inculcated in Israel, by emphasizing concepts and practices of vospitannost’ (manners) and obiazannosti (obligations). Moreover, Russian-speaking Israelis cultivate the style of vospitanie (educating a child), making it an indicator of Russian identity for their Israeli-born children, and use it as a resource for maintaining power in relation to both their Israeli-born children and local Israelis. However, our analysis also revealed that the powerful discourse of vospitanie is challenged in Israel by a new language and a new communication style that is deeply rooted in the Israeli cultural ethos. We show how immigrants’ children become the agents of the change, when they introduce a new type of discourse and language to the family’s educational communication and resist vospitanie discourse.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)119-140
Number of pages22
JournalRussian Journal of Communication
Volume5
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2013

Keywords

  • Child raising discourse
  • Cross-cultural interpersonal interaction
  • Cultural communicative style
  • Educational communication
  • Russian immigrants in israel

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