WAVELENGTH VARIATION OF VISIBLE AND NEAR-INFRARED RESOLUTION THROUGH THE ATMOSPHERE: DEPENDENCE ON AEROSOL AND METEOROLOGICAL CONDITIONS.

N. S. Kopeika, S. Solomon, Y. Gencay

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Abstract

Measurements of square wave response over a 4. 1-km near-field horizontal path are presented for different wavelength regions. Relatively high winds generate increased concentrations of soil-derived aerosols that noticeably dampen low-spatial-frequency IR response. At diurnal C//n minimums, when turbulence is not severe, even more severe dampening of higher-spatial-frequency IR response by these aerosols is observed also. However, when such aerosols are of reduced concentration, best-quality imaging through the atmosphere is observed in the IR rather than in the visible. This model of the wavelength dependence of imaging through the atmosphere is believed to be independent of geographical location.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)892-901
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the Optical Society of America
Volume71
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 1981

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