When values matter: Expressing values in behavioral intentions for the near vs. distant future

Tal Eyal, Michael D. Sagristano, Yaacov Trope, Nira Liberman, Shelly Chaiken

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

205 Scopus citations

Abstract

It was predicted that because of their abstract nature, values will have greater impact on how individuals plan their distant future than their near future. Experiments 1 and 2 found that values better predict behavioral intentions for distant future situations than near future situations. Experiment 3 found that whereas high-level values predict behavioral intentions for more distant future situations, low-level feasibility considerations predict behavioral intentions for more proximate situation. Finally, Experiment 4 found that the temporal changes in the relationship between values and behavioral intentions depended on how the behavior was construed. Higher correspondence is found when behaviors are construed on a higher level and when behavior is planned for the more distant future than when the same behavior is construed on a lower level or is planned for the more proximal future. The implications of these findings for self-consistency and value conflicts are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)35-43
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Experimental Social Psychology
Volume45
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2009

Keywords

  • Behavioral intentions
  • Construal
  • Construal level theory
  • Time perspective
  • Values

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

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