Why citizens still rarely serve as news sources: Validating a tripartite model of circumstantial, logistical, and evaluative barriers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

Despite being equipped to an unprecedented extent to become substantial news players, despite a growing need for their journalistic input, and despite the promise of user-generated content to give them voice, ordinary citizens remain a negligible news source. To explore why this is so, I propose a model that indicates journalists' reliance on citizens is hindered by three factors: circumstantial (situations calling for input from citizens arise ad hoc), logistical (using them requires greater journalistic effort), and evaluative (journalists appreciate their contributions less). A broad comparison of contacts with ordinary citizens against contacts with other source types (N = 2,381) in Israel strongly validates this model. To enhance their access, citizens may need not only a technological revolution but also a social, cultural, and epistemic revolution.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2412-2433
Number of pages22
JournalInternational Journal of Communication
Volume9
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2015

Keywords

  • Citizens
  • Israel
  • News access
  • News sources
  • Participation
  • Technology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication

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