X-Ray diffraction evidence for the role of stacking faults in plastic deformation of solids under shock loading

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Abstract

A mechanism responsible for the high speed shear relaxation immediately behind shock fronts is suggested. The shear stress generated by the shock front causes the growth of two-dimensional defects in the crystal lattice, known as stacking faults (SF). Increasing the SF concentration and area leads to the absorption of impact energy. A breach of the lattice symmetry due to the SF presence causes an additional shift in peaks of the x-ray diffraction pattern obtained from the shock compressed material. Thus pulse x-ray diffraction is the only method that experimentally measures both the dilatational and deviatoric components of the deformation, which takes place during shock wave passage.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)113-116
Number of pages4
JournalShock Waves
Volume2
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jun 1992

Keywords

  • Partial dislocations
  • Shear stress and strain
  • Stacking faults

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